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Adult Day Care

Normally, adult day care is used to relieve the caregiver of his or her duties for the day while ensuring that the care recipient will still receive the proper care in a safe, friendly environment. Often this type of care is called "respite" care. These centers usually operate during normal business hours five days a week, and some centers also offer additional services during evenings and weekends.

In general, there are three main types of adult day care centers: those that focus primarily on social interaction, those that provide medical care and those dedicated to Alzheimer's care. Many of these facilities are affiliated with other organizations, including home care agencies, skilled nursing facilities, medical centers or other senior service providers.

Regulation of adult day care centers is at the discretion of each state, although the National Adult Day Services Association (NADSA) offers some overall guidelines in its Standards and Guidelines for Adult Day Care. The staff usually consists of a social worker, an activity director and an activity aide, who often is a certified nursing aide (CNA). Many adult day care centers also rely on volunteers to run various activities.

Morning Star Adult Day

MorningStar Adult Day Care